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re: AW: zen and the fluent Music

Rainer wrote to my first post:

> I don't see the Heisenberg influence here at all. It
> seems like taking
> Einstein's laws to explain why cars do not drive
> faster than 55 or 65
> mph on American highways...

Please excuse, Rainer.................I included about five connected  
in that previous one sentence that are firmly connected in my brain and 
rereading what I wrote realize that the connection in my mind wasn't 
communicated at all.   I was tired when I wrote it, please forgive me.

What I meant to say is that given the fact that we can not see things 
a certain size with an electron micropscope (what is it now?  thirty years 
ago it was a quarter of a wave length of a certain frequency of light) and 
due to the fact that human beings can only hazard a guess where an 
'is' at any given instant just means that it is tough for us to talk with 
great certainty about 'reality'.  Add to the fact the the photons have to 
travel to our retina; be converted into electrical signals, ad nauseum 
throws more of a wrench into things.

But my understanding of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle is limited to 
one lecture where a lay person explained it's relevance to cognitive theory
during about a ten minute interval almost thirty years ago.   I shouldn't 
have even mentioned it because I'm not qualified to.

I was just trying to get across my own personal understanding that we, as 
human beings are doomed to create patterns out of our experience but 
that limitation;  having humility about it and having the creative 
experience enobles us to make better and better maps.

Hell, I'm a drummer originally, so I love to use patterns.  I find that 
juxtaposing formulaic patterns is a very useful way to make things that 
sound good to my ears.   At the same time,  I love chaos and randomness 
'the new'.     I think there is room for all in the musical world.    When 
play funk, however,  I really like to play with a bass player who really 
knows how to play within the somewhat rigid stylistic confines of that 
There are 2 to the 16 power possible single line rhythms possible in any 
given measure of 4/4 using 16th notes as the smallest note 
value............there's a ton of room for creativity even in, say, the 
world of 1970's era East Coast Funk,  but it's really fucking funky when 
someone knows how to play the game.     But that's just me.  Scott Kungha 
Drengsen or maybe even Steve Lawson (who loves soul music) might disagree 
with me and they'd be legit.